This Is Ella Fitzgerald Scat Singing Impact To Jazz - bluesandjazz.net

This Is Ella Fitzgerald Scat Singing Impact To Jazz


This is Ella Fitzgerald Scat Singing Impact To Jazz

If you ever hear jazz music, you will almost likely experience “scatting” or “scat.” Well for some people, it was a descent of jazz singing to an unseemly expression and non-sense. Other great jazz critics said that “scat” should be banned from the jazz genre. Still, many of the greatest exponents of scat, whether white or black, most often radiate fun such as Ella Fitzgerald. Ella Fitzgerald scat singing is one of the essential aspects of the history of jazz. Not just for the quality of her beautiful and unique voice but also for her improvisational skills.

Ella Fitzgerald

This is Ella Fitzgerald Scat Singing Impact To Jazz
This Is Ella Fitzgerald Scat Singing Impact To Jazz

Adorned with the honorific title of “The First Lady of Song,” Ella Fitzgerald’s track to fame was a typical rags-to-riches story. Born into a poor family in Newport News, Virginia in April 1917. After her parents’ divorce, she and her mother moved to Yonkers, New York. After the untimely death of her mother when she was 15 years old, she then lived with her aunt. Soon, she found herself living in rough and ran into trouble in the streets of Harlem. But with her impressive vocal talent, Ella shined as she won an amateur talent competition at the Apollo Theater, Harlem, in 1934 in her late teens. She then joined the Chick Webb Orchestra and tour with the group in some of the famous jazz bars in New York City.

How Did Ella Fitzgerald Discover Her Scat Singing?

This is Ella Fitzgerald Scat Singing Impact To Jazz
This Is Ella Fitzgerald Scat Singing Impact To Jazz

In 1936, Ella Fitzgerald made her first recording entitled “Love and Kisses.” The song was a moderate success and was released under the Decca label. At that time, Fitzgerald performs with Chick’s band at the well-known Harlem’s Savoy Ballroom. Later, she began singing song renditions. At that time, the period of big swing bands was changing. The main focus was turning toward the bebop genre. Then, she played with the new style and often used her voice to take the role of horn in the band. She first began her scat singing experimentation to the song “You Have to Swing It.” Hence, her vocalization and improvisation have thrilled the fans. In her career, she masters the scat singing and turns it into a form of art in singing.

Where Did Ella Fitzgerald Scat Singing Bring Her?

This is Ella Fitzgerald Scat Singing Impact To Jazz
This Is Ella Fitzgerald Scat Singing Impact To Jazz

In American music history, no one has been matching the purity of Ella’s tone. The precision of tone and the hipness of her ideas and phrasing brought her scat singing famous worldwide. Her career almost spanned for 60 years, and that time, she almost sold 40 million records, lauded by the president, and won 13 Grammys. Ella toured around the world and met legendary performers such as Frank Sinatra and Count Basie. She was dubbed as the Queen of Jazz with high praises, and indeed, she deserved that title. As of today, her unique tones and the way she sings influence a lot of musicians in the same genre. She is a true American treasure, and without her, jazz would not be the same.

The End Of An Era

This is Ella Fitzgerald Scat Singing Impact To Jazz
This Is Ella Fitzgerald Scat Singing Impact To Jazz

She continued to work as hard as she can in her earlier career, despite enduring health issues. In 1986, she underwent coronary bypass surgery. She was diagnosed with diabetes, and doctors replaced a valve in her heart, which blamed her for her failing eyesight. There are rumors by the media that she would never step in stage, but she proved them wrong. Despite all the worries and protests by her family and friends, she returned to the stage and pushed on with her schedule. By 1990, she recorded over a total of 200 albums. In 1991, she gave her last and final concert at New York City’s famous Carnegie Hall. At the age of 76, she experienced severe circulatory problems and was forced to amputate both her legs. She never fully recovered from the surgery. During that time, she enjoyed sitting outside her house and spend time with her family. In June 1996, she passed away in her Beverly Hills home.

Surely, Ella Fitzgerald has made a lot of contributions not only for his scat singing but also for overcoming discrimination. She was considered as the best female singer in jazz in the US. Many of her fans were captivated by her voice, either black or white, rich or poor, all religions and nationalities. They all have a binding factor in common, in which they all loved her.

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