Jazz Movements: Understanding Each One - bluesandjazz.net

Jazz Movements: Understanding Each One


Jazz Movements: Understanding Each One

As Jazz has evolved into various forms, we cannot avoid its beginning and how it greatly affects the United States. Undoubtedly, it has a significant impact way back earlier during the time of the Black Americans’ race relations. Hence, a cultural reflection of America’s history. Jazz served as the creation of Black Americans’ clear expressive culture under the cruel conditions of racism and enslavement. Jazz has played a significant role in the feminist and race movements in America. Since then, it was seen by so many as America’s classical music and became recognized as a vital form of musical expression. So, if you’re wondering what Jazz movements provide a big part in American music history.

New Orleans Jazz

Jazz Movements: Understanding Each One
Jazz Movements: Understanding Each One

It started at the end of the 19th-century and up to the early 20th-century. It was closely related to the popular marching bands in New Orleans. Jazz was typically led by a cornet or trumpet and supported by other horn instruments and reeds. Drums and bass also backed the movement. The emphasis was on melodic, and collective improvisation and solos were nonexistent.

Jazz Movements: Dixieland

Jazz Movements: Understanding Each One
Jazz Movements: Understanding Each One

Also called the “Chicago Jazz,” Dixieland was transpired when most musicians ran away from New Orleans to Chicago. The reason was in search of new opportunities and less cruel social conditions. It was closely related to New Orleans Jazz and made use of melodic and collective improvisation. But, Dixieland allowed incorporated and solos.

Swing

Jazz Movements: Understanding Each One
Jazz Movements: Understanding Each One

It was formed in 1935 up to the end of World War II in 1945. The swing was the mark of improvisation to Jazz notated music. It was also known as a larger ensemble “Big Bands.” Due to the size of the ensemble, it is made up of several reeds, horns, and percussion instruments. The swing requires written arrangements and was more repetitive. The swing is more pop-friendly than other types or forms in Jazz. Moreover, it was the closest Jazz that has been America’s most popular music.

­­Bop

Jazz Movements: Understanding Each One
Jazz Movements: Understanding Each One

Also referred to as the “Bebop,” Bop was developed in 1945 or the post-swing era. The spotlight of Bop was on the soloist.

The bebop style was the new style in Jazz, but it has been criticized by many. The soloist’s basis for improvisation was the chord progression. Hence, he trades the music’s melodic phrasing for chordal, and it was the lacking melody of the music. However, the Bop was more abstract and faster and not used for dancing. It pushed the genre for the first time to low culture and art status.

Cool Jazz

Jazz Movements: Understanding Each One
Jazz Movements: Understanding Each One

It was developed in the 50s and 60s and also known as the West Coast Jazz. It marked the come back to retained elements and arrangements of swing. Cool Jazz arises on Bop, yet it has been smoothed out the hard edges rhythmically and tonally. The players were more educated studio artists, and many of them are transitioned to experimental forms.

Jazz Movements: Fusion

Jazz Movements: Understanding Each One
Jazz Movements: Understanding Each One

Fusion was made famous in the mid-1960s up to the end of the 1970s. It was a combination of Jazz and rock music. As rock became the norm and became complex and its musicians became skilled, players in both genres began to experiment. Over the years, the combination was crystallized into its form, although it remains not recognized by some jazz purists.

All in all, Jazz has a lot of forms and movements throughout the past. It only shows that Jazz has evolved since then. Thanks to some of its dedicated artists and musicians that have stayed and maintain the course of the genre.

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