Duke Ellington's Jazz Contribution: Things You Didn't Know -

Duke Ellington’s Jazz Contribution: Things You Didn’t Know


Duke Ellington's Jazz Contribution: Things You Didn't Know About It

Duke Ellington was one of the important creative forces in the music of the 20th-century. Duke Ellington’s Jazz contribution to popular music and classical music cannot be overstated. He was born in Washington D.C., in April 1899. He was raised into a middle-class Black-American family. First, his ambition was to become a painter but became interested in his early teens in music. Soon after, he was part of a local or small jazz band as a piano player in the state. Duke later moved to New York City in 1923 and formed his band after a year. As time passed by, around 1927, he found a small base of fans and secured an engagement at the famous Cotton Club. It proved a significant turning point for his career, providing him access to larger crowds and audiences through recordings and radio.

Importance Of Duke Ellington’s Jazz To Music

Duke Ellington's Jazz Contribution: Things You Didn't Know About It
Duke Ellington’s Jazz Contribution: Things You Didn’t Know

Well, there are many reasons why he is so vital in jazz culture. To put it briefly, the uniqueness of piano playing as well as the sound of his big band. Ellington didn’t invent the big band or something, but he composed and arranged the way that anyone would realize that it was Duke Ellington. Duke wrote more than 3,000 compositions in his career. Many of his compositions became classic standards in the American songbooks. One of the elements that have made him is that the arrangement and his unique piano plays are the way he used to color his music. The use of his harmony and different rhythms that created the image of his sound.

During The Harlem Renaissance

Duke Ellington's Jazz Contribution: Things You Didn't Know About It
Duke Ellington’s Jazz Contribution: Things You Didn’t Know

In the Harlem Renaissance period, the contribution of Ellington came from him playing regularly at a club in N.Y. city. The name of the jazz club was The Cotton Club located in Harlem from 1923 to 1935. The race was played into the performance of the many jazz musicians at the club, which was then the whites-only establishment. He lifted the jazz music from a mere musical entertainment for whites to a state of aestheticism. Ellington also developed the edgy sound for portraying the harsh reality of living within the U.S. as a Black-American. He brought not only the musical development of the Harlem Renaissance but also a racial development.

Duke Ellington’s Jazz: Remembering His Legacy

Duke Ellington's Jazz Contribution: Things You Didn't Know About It
Duke Ellington’s Jazz Contribution: Things You Didn’t Know

Ellington was a patient and humble man that loved peace. He was up to date recognized as the cornerstone of America. In addition to Ellington’s composition, he was also a great leader that influenced many of his band members to produce their own personal music. He used his band to showcase the musical talents among many young people and musicians. On his death in 1974, many musicians worldwide have still revisited his works. Thus, this only shows that the influence of his compositions was for the public. In 2009, the government of the U.S. launched a coin that features Duke Ellington. He broke the record of being the first Black-American to appear on the U.S. currency.

Famous Songs Of Duke “Dumpy” Ellington

Duke Ellington's Jazz Contribution: Things You Didn't Know About It
Duke Ellington’s Jazz Contribution: Things You Didn’t Know

He was primarily an instrumental composer, and most of his creations were written as an instrumental piece. Words were tacked on his later date songs. Many of his remaining were remarkable songs that were loved by millions of fans worldwide.

Among his best-known and famous songs are:

  • Sophisticated Lady
  • In A Sentimental Mood
  • Prelude To A Kiss
  • I Let A Song Go Out Of My Heart
  • I Got It Bad (And That Ain’t Good)
  • Don’t Get Around Much Any More
  • Do Nothin’ Till You Hear From Me
  • I Didn’t Know About You
  • Satin Doll

Indeed, Ellington was a great composer and musician of the 20th-century. With almost 1500 composition and with 10000 sound recordings. With his entire music life, Ellington participated in 600 stage performance. He was successful and made a lot of contributions to jazz history.

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